2018 / Huntington Library: Japanese Teahouse Tours, Nov. 12

Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
Public Programs and Event

Faux Bois at The Huntington
Nov. 11 (Sunday) 2:30 p.m.

Craftsman Terry Eagan will introduce and narrate a series of time-lapse images by photographer Michael Stern documenting Eagan’s restoration of the century-old faux bois trellises in The Huntington’s Japanese Garden and Rose Garden areas. Faux bois (French for “false wood”) is an art form that uses sculpted concrete to create structures resembling rustic wood. This style of garden ornamentation was fashionable in the early 1900s, when the gardens on the Huntington estate were first established, and the trellises have lent historic charm to the landscape ever since. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Japanese Teahouse Tours
Nov. 12 (Monday) 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Learn about the history of the Japanese Garden’s ceremonial teahouse and the traditions behind its use. Informal tours are offered at 20-minute intervals on the second Monday of every month. No reservations required. General admission. Japanese Garden

East Asian Garden Lecture Series
New Explorations in Tea History: Putting Women and Children First
Nov. 13 (Tuesday) 7:30 p.m.

Rebecca Corbett, Japanese studies librarian at USC, explores aspects of tea culture in Japan’s Edo period (1603-1868) and its use in children’s education. Corbett’s current project focuses on the Buddhist nun and artist Tagami Kikusha (1753-1826) and the transmission of her work in modern Japan. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Japanese Teahouse Tours
Dec. 10 (Monday) 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Learn about the history of the Japanese Garden’s ceremonial teahouse and the traditions behind its use. Informal tours are offered at 20-minute intervals on the second Monday of every month. No reservations required. General admission. Japanese Garden

Viewing Stones Show
Dec. 26-30 (Wednesday-Sunday) 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

The California Aiseki Kai presents its 29th annual show featuring outstanding examples of suiseki and other viewing stones. Practiced in Asia for centuries and gaining popularity around the world, the art of viewing stones invites contemplation of the subtle, often fanciful forms that have been shaped by nature, the elements, and time. General admission. Brody Botanical Center

A related display presented by the American Viewing Stone Resource Center will be on view during the same dates in the Botanical Centers Flora-Legium gallery.

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November 2018

Screening and Panel Discussion
Craft in America: California
Nov. 1 (Thursday) 7:30 p.m.

Join us for a preview screening of Craft in America: California, an upcoming episode of the award-winning PBS documentary series which explores America’s creative spirit. This episode highlights the work of California architects Charles and Henry Greene, cabinet makers Jim and Jack Ipekjian, and the stained glass artists of Judson Studios. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Craft in America’s executive producer Carol Sauvion, with Gamble House Director Ted Bosley, restoration architect Kelly Sutherlin-McLeod, and Gamble family member Joseph Messler, Jr. Free; advance reservations required. Registration: huntington.org/calendar. Rothenberg Hall

Holiday Flowers for Entertaining
Nov. 3 (Saturday) 10 a.m.-noon

“Tis the season for entertaining. Is your table ready to party? Learn how to create a statement floral centerpiece, and pick up tips for creating a beautiful holiday tablescape, in this workshop led by Casey Schwartz and Kit Wertz of Flower Duet. Fee includes all materials. Members: $85. Non-Members: $100.? Registration: huntington.org/calendar.

Childrens Workshop
Chinese Brush Painting: Fall Flowers
Nov. 3 (Saturday) 10 a.m.-noon

Autumn-blooming chrysanthemums and colorful fall foliage provide the inspiration for a Chinese brush painting class with artist Peifang Liang. Each child will receive a painting kit to take home along with their finished artwork. Ages 7 and up. (Fee includes one child and one accompanying adult). Members: $30. Non-Members: $40. Registration: huntington.org/calendar.

Childrens Workshop
Flowers for Entertaining
Nov. 3 (Saturday) 1-2:30 p.m.

Holiday entertaining is a family affair. Kids will create festive centerpieces made with fresh flowers and learn how to set the table for special occasions in this fun workshop Casey Schwartz and Kit Wertz of Flower Duet. Ages 7 and up. (Fee includes one child and one accompanying adult.) Members: $35. Non-Members: $45. Registration: huntington.org/calendar

Calligraphy Demonstration by Tang Qingnian
Nov. 4 (Sunday) 2 p.m.

The art of ink-and-brush calligraphy has long been prized in China as a form of creative expression and an embodiment of scholarly culture. Contemporary artist Tang Qingnian 唐慶年will demonstrate his calligraphy, which enlivens past traditions with a modern aesthetic sensibility. Originally from Beijing, Tang was at the forefront of China’s “New Wave” art movement in the 1980s before relocating to the United States. A discussion with the artist will follow the demonstration. Free; no reservations required. Rose Hills Garden Court and Rothenberg Hall

Botanical Conservation Lecture
Saving the World
s Threatened Plant Species
Nov. 5 (Monday) 4:30 p.m.

Can botanic gardens conserve all of the world’s rare and threatened plant species?
Paul Smith, secretary general of Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI), will discuss the approaches, methodologies, and milestones being employed by botanic gardens and arboreta around the world – including here at The Huntington – to protect rare and threatened species from becoming extinct. BGCI is the largest plant conservation network in the world, representing a network of 800 member botanic gardens in 100 countries, along with some 60,000 scientists, horticulturists and educators. This network already conserves and manages more than 90% of plant families, 50% of genera, and 30% of species in its living collections and seed banks. Following the example of the crop conservation community, BGCI’s botanic garden-centered Global System for the conservation and management of plant diversity aims to collect, characterize, and conserve all of the world’s rare and threatened plants as an insurance policy against their extinction in the wild. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Trent R. Dames Lecture
America’s Costliest Natural Disaster: Rust
Nov. 6 (Tuesday) 7:30 p.m.

Rust, which has been called “the great destroyer,” consumes cars, fells bridges, sinks ships, sparks house fires, and nearly brought down the Statue of Liberty. Join Jonathan Waldman, author of Rust: The Longest War, for an illuminating look at the unsung heroes – engineers -who are working to keep our modern world from wasting away. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Chamber Music Concert
Camerata Pacifica
Nov. 7 (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.

Camerata Pacifica’s two-year Beethoven project continues with a program featuring the composer’s Quintet for Piano and Winds, Op. 16, plus works by Sir Charles Villiers Stanford, Mikhail Glinka, and Bohuslav Martinu. $58.  Tickets: www.cameratapacifica.org  or 805 884-8410. Rothenberg Hall

The Crimes and Misdemeanors of Johnny Jenkins
Nov. 8 (Thursday) 7:30 p.m.

Michael Vinson, author and proprietor of Michael Vinson Americana, shares the tale of John Holmes Jenkins III (1940-1989), a Texas antiquarian bookseller, publisher, historian, and gambler who, in 1971, helped the FBI recover a valuable set of original colored engravings of Audubon’s The Birds of America. This program is the Book Club of California’s Kenneth Karmiole Endowed Lecture on the History of the Book Trade in California and the West. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Garden Talk & Sale
Street Plants: Wild Flora of L.A.
Nov. 8 (Thursday) 2:30 p.m.

Cities may seem to be solely the work of humans — right down to the urban landscape of street trees, ornamental plantings, and manicured lawns that were put in place by human hands. But wild plants spread through the landscape without any human help, forming a ubiquitous botanical backdrop that exists at the fringes of most concepts of nature. Join Evan Meyer of the UCLA Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden for a discussion of the wild flora of inner-city Los Angeles and how these plants highlight the deep interconnectedness of the natural and cultural worlds. Free; no reservations required. A plant sale follows the talk. Ahmanson Room, Brody Botanical Center

Spotlight Gallery Talk
Project Blue Boy
Nov. 8 (Thursday) 5 p.m.

Join Melinda McCurdy, associate curator of British art, and Christina O’Connell, senior paintings conservator, for a gallery talk about the conservation of The Huntington’s most famous painting, Thomas Gainsborough’s Blue Boy. Conservation treatment is currently in progress inside the gallery, where the public can watch and learn about the process. Members: $15. Non-Members: $20. Registration: www.huntington.org/calendar.

Taste of Art: Los Angeles Restaurant Menus
Nov. 10 (Saturday) 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Explore iconic Southern California architecture of the 1920s and ‘30s in the exhibition “Architects of a Golden Age,” then prepare a meal inspired by menus from some of the era’s most popular L.A. restaurants, including the Musso & Frank Grill and the Brown Derby. Maite Gomez-Rejon of ArtBites leads this cooking workshop. Members: $85. Non-Members: $100. Registration: www.huntington.org/calendar.

Family Day
Word Play
Nov. 10 (Saturday) 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Back by popular demand! Explore the power of words in a fun-filled day of activities for the whole family. Try your hand at printing on a Ben Franklin-type press, courtesy of the International Printing Museum; weave your words into a collaborative poem created on a textile loom; enjoy pop-up poetry readings by members of WriteGirl, the Los Angeles-based the creative writing mentorship organization; and much more. General admission. Rose Hills Garden Court and other locations

Faux Bois at The Huntington
Nov. 11 (Sunday) 2:30 p.m.

Craftsman Terry Eagan will introduce and narrate a series of time-lapse images by photographer Michael Stern documenting Eagan’s restoration of the century-old faux bois trellises in The Huntington’s Japanese Garden and Rose Garden areas. Faux bois (French for “false wood”) is an art form that uses sculpted concrete to create structures resembling rustic wood. This style of garden ornamentation was fashionable in the early 1900s, when the gardens on the Huntington estate were first established, and the trellises have lent historic charm to the landscape ever since. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Japanese Teahouse Tours
Nov. 12 (Monday) 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Learn about the history of the Japanese Garden’s ceremonial teahouse and the traditions behind its use. Informal tours are offered at 20-minute intervals on the second Monday of every month. No reservations required. General admission. Japanese Garden

Film Screening
“The Life and Gardens of Beatrix Farrand

Nov. 12 (Monday) 7:30 p.m.

Documentary filmmaker and six-time Emmy Award-winner Karyl Evans will present a screening of her film on the life and career of American landscape architect Beatrix Farrand (1872-1959), whose work included gardens at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C.; the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden; and gardens at Caltech and Occidental College, among other commissions. Farrand, the niece of Edith Wharton, grew up in the privileged world of the East Coast elite and fought the challenges of a male-dominated profession to successfully design more than 200 landscapes during her remarkable 50-year career. From 1927-41, Farrand lived on the Huntington property in San Marino with her husband, historian Max Farrand, during his tenure as the first director of the institution. The couple lived in the Director’s House (now the Huntington President’s home), where some traces of the gardens that Farrand designed for that residence still remain today. Following the 40-minute film, Evans will discuss the restoration of Farrand’s work at Yale University. The program is presented as part of the California Garden & Landscape History Society Lecture Series. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

East Asian Garden Lecture Series
New Explorations in Tea History: Putting Women and Children First
Nov. 13 (Tuesday) 7:30 p.m.

Rebecca Corbett, Japanese studies librarian at USC, explores aspects of tea culture in Japan’s Edo period (1603-1868) and its use in children’s education. Corbett’s current project focuses on the Buddhist nun and artist Tagami Kikusha (1753-1826) and the transmission of her work in modern Japan. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Wines of Northern Italy
Nov. 14 (Wednesday) 5-7:30 p.m.

The vineyards of Northern Italy produce some of the most superb wines in the world. Join sommelier Brad Owen for an in-depth lecture and tasting focusing on Barolo and Barbaresco from the Piedmont area as well as wines of the Friuli region. Members: $90. Non Members: $105. Registration: www.huntington.org/calendar.

Distinguished Fellow Lecture
Government and Family Life: The Unintended Consequences of the English Poor Relief System, 1660-1780
Nov. 14 (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.

The sophisticated system of social welfare developed in 17th- and 18th-century England aimed to assist the poor. Naomi Tadmor, professor of history at the University of Lancaster and the Fletcher Jones Foundation Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, will discuss its significant impact not only on local government but also on the lives of families and communities. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Huntington-USC Western Environment Series
The Ecocentrists: A History of Radical Environmentalism
Nov. 15 (Thursday) 4 p.m.

In the 1980s, disenchantment with the mainstream environmental movement led activists in to launch a more radical movement, one that subscribed to a philosophy that attributed as much value to nature as to people. Adherents used direct action, from tree-sits to industrial sabotage, to save a wild nature that they believed to be in a state of crisis. Keith Makoto Woodhouse, professor of history and environmental policy and culture at Northwestern University, will explore the tensions between radical environmentalism and humanism, social justice, and economic inequality. The lecture is part of a series from the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West exploring the environmental history of the modern American West. Free; no reservations required. Ahmanson Room, Brody Botanical Center

Conference
A History of the Medical Book
Nov. 16-17 (Friday-Saturday) 9:15 a.m.-5 p.m.

This conference offers a range of perspectives on medical texts that emphasize their lives as books, bringing together the disciplines of the history of medicine and of book history. Speakers will explore a wide variety of medical genres in diverse chronological contexts, posing questions about change and continuity in the nature of the medical book. $25. Registration: www.huntington.org/medicalbook. Rothenberg Hall

Painting with Nan Rae
Nov. 21 & Dec. 19 (Wednesdays) 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Learn to create watercolors inspired by the art of Chinese brush painting in this monthly class with artist Nan Rae. Newcomers welcome. Each session: $50. Registration: 818-842-6489.

Family Drop-In Program
Garden Party
Nov. 24 (Saturday) 1-2 p.m.

It’s time for another “Garden Party,” our popular drop-in program in the Children’s Garden. Hang out with our hummingbird friend, Bing, for an hour of stories and hands-on activities. Our special theme for fall is the story of seeds and how they grow. Drop by and join the fun! Ages 3 and up. General admission. Childrens Garden

Ranch Open House
Every Saturday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Stop by The Huntington’s urban agriculture site during its weekly open hours and pick up some fresh ideas for sustainable gardening. Volunteers from the L.A. Master Gardener program will be on hand to answer questions and offer seasonal tips. From the Teaching Greenhouse, follow signs to the site. (Cancelled in the event of rain.) General admission. Ranch Garden

Music in the Chinese Garden
Every Wednesday, 1-3 p.m.

Enjoy traditional Chinese music every Wednesday afternoon in the Garden of Flowing Fragrance. A different solo musician will perform each week in the Love for the Lotus Pavilion, adding to the garden’s ambience with the sounds of the pipa (lute), erhu (two-stringed fiddle) dizi (flute), yangqin (dulcimer), or guzheng (zither). General admission. (Cancelled in the event of rain.) Chinese Garden

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December 2018

Tai Chi Series
Dec 1-Jan 12 (Saturdays) 8:30-10 a.m.

Experience tai chi in the tranquil setting of the gardens in this seven-part series led by instructor Kathy Chyan, suitable for beginning and intermediate students. Class is held in the Chinese Garden. Members: $150. Non-Members: $175. Advanced registration is required.

Holiday Wreaths and Garlands
Dec. 1 (Saturday) 10 a.m.-noon

Deck the halls this holiday season with your own handcrafted wreath and garland, made with fresh evergreen branches, bright berries, and richly-hued flowers. Learn the tips and techniques of the pros in this workshop presented by Flower Duet. All materials provided. Members: $85. Non-Members: $100.? Registration: www.huntington.org/calendar.

Chamber Music Concert
Camerata Pacifica
Dec. 4 (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.

The ensemble is joined by the Calder String Quartet for a program that includes Beethoven’s String Quartet in F Major, Op. 135; Anton Arensky’s String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 35; and Felix Mendelssohn’s Octet in E-flat Major, Op. 20. $58. Tickets: www.cameratapacifica.org or 805 884-8410. Rothenberg Hall

Huntington-USC Western Environment Series
Braided Waters: Environment and Society in Molokai, Hawaii
Dec. 5 (Wednesday) 4 p.m.

Environmental and cultural historian Wade Graham discusses his new book on the environmental history of the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Graham will be joined by Daniel Lewis, Dibner Senior Curator of the History of Science and Technology at The Huntington, for a discussion that ranges widely over the terrain of evolution, non-human species variation, and the fate of a vulnerable necklace of island ecologies in the heart of the Pacific. Free; no reservations required. Ahmanson Room, Brody Botanical Center

Distinguished Fellow Lecture
Reading a Photograph: Stories from the 19th-Century West
Dec. 5 (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.

Martha A. Sandweiss, professor of history at Princeton University and The Huntington’s 2018-19 Los Angeles Times Distinguished Fellow, looks at how a single photograph from treaty negotiations at Ft. Laramie in 1868 reveals tangled stories about race, violence, and family life that would otherwise be hidden from view. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Champagne and Sparkling Wine
Dec. 6 (Thursday) 5-7:30 p.m.

Sparkling wines are often reserved for special celebrations, yet their delicate flavor makes them some of the most versatile wines for everyday enjoyment. Sommelier Brad Owen will give an in-depth lecture, followed by a tasting of approximately a dozen different wines, with bread and cheese for sampling. Members: $90. Non-Members: $105. Registration: www.huntington.org/calendar.

Conference
Moving Landscapes: Gardens and Gardening in the Transatlantic World, 1670-1830
Dec. 7-8 (Friday-Saturday) 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Both as physical locations and as fantasies of selfhood, gardens always speak of where – and how – we see ourselves in the world. Focusing on the imagination and creation of gardens in the disparate geographies of 18th-century Europe, the Caribbean, and North America, this conference explores transatlantic ideas of nation, location, and self, and asks how the experience of gardens might be shared across nations, oceans, and cultures. $25. Registration: www.huntington.org/moving-landscapes. Rothenberg Hall

Taste of Art: A Dickens Christmas
Dec. 8 (Saturday) 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Get a taste of holiday cheer the way Charles Dickens might have written it. In this cooking workshop with chef and art educator Maite Gomez-Rejon, participants will discuss the literature, paintings, and decorative arts of the Victorian era before preparing a contemporary meal adapted from period cookbooks. Members: $85. Non-Members: $100. Registration: www.huntington.org/calendar

Japanese Teahouse Tours
Dec. 10 (Monday) 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Learn about the history of the Japanese Garden’s ceremonial teahouse and the traditions behind its use. Informal tours are offered at 20-minute intervals on the second Monday of every month. No reservations required. General admission. Japanese Garden

GardenLust: A Botanical Tour of the Worlds Best New Gardens
Dec. 12 (Wednesday) 2:30 p.m.

For three years, award-winning horticulturist Chris Woods traveled the world seeking out contemporary gardens. In his book GardenLust, he celebrates 50 of the best. With wit and humor, Woods describes the most arresting features in public parks, botanic gardens, and private estates in locations ranging from New Delhi and Dubai to Chile and Australia. Throughout, he reveals the fascinating people, plants, and stories that make these gardens so lust-worthy. A book signing will follow the talk. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Nevins Lecture
The Lady and George Washington
Dec. 12 (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.

Mary Sarah Bilder, Founders Professor at Boston College Law School, discusses the responses of George Washington and Benjamin Rush to Eliza Harriot O’Connor’s remarkable university lectures in 1787 and their implications for female political status under the Constitution. O’Connor was the first American female lecturer and principal of a female academy. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall

Holiday Music
Vox Feminae
Dec. 13 (Thursday), 1-2 p.m.

Dressed in elaborate costumes and performing on period instruments, the vocal ensemble Vox Feminae sings sacred and secular holiday music from the Medieval and Renaissance eras. Free. Rose Hills Garden Court

Garden Talk & Sale
Growing Healthy Soil
Dec. 13 (Thursday) 2:30 p.m.

Garett Long, research and outreach coordinator at Apricot Lane Farms, discusses how to build a healthier soil food web – the community of organisms living in the soil – to help grow healthier plants. A self-described “soil geek,” Long is particularly interested in the relationship between farming practices, soil health, and the nutritional quality of food. A plant sale will follow the program. Free; no reservations required. Ahmanson Room, Brody Botanical Center

Childrens Workshop
Terrific Terrariums
Dec. 15 (Saturday) 10 a.m.-noon

Take a tour of the Teaching Greenhouse and learn how to design, build, and care for your own miniature ecosystem – a terrarium filled with amazing air plants. All materials provided. Ages 7 and up. (Fee includes one child and one accompanying adult). Members: $55. Non-Members: $65. Registration: www.huntington.org/calendar.

Viewing Stones Show
Dec. 26-30 (Wednesday-Sunday) 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

The California Aiseki Kai presents its 29th annual show featuring outstanding examples of suiseki and other viewing stones. Practiced in Asia for centuries and gaining popularity around the world, the art of viewing stones invites contemplation of the subtle, often fanciful forms that have been shaped by nature, the elements, and time. General admission. Brody Botanical Center

A related display presented by the American Viewing Stone Resource Center will be on view during the same dates in the Botanical Centers Flora-Legium gallery.

Botany Bay Series
Plant Science for Citizen Scientists
Dec. 27 (Thursday) 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Explore the wonders of the plant world through discussion and hands-on lab time in this series for ‘citizen scientists” led by Jim Folsom, the Telleen/Jorgensen Director of the Botanical Gardens. Free; no reservations required. Auditorium, Brody Botanical Center

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Exhibitions

Architects of a Golden Age
Oct 06, 2018 – Jan 21, 2019
Library, West Hall

Documenting one of the most creative and influential periods in Southern California architecture, the exhibition spotlights about 20 original drawings and plans selected from The Huntington’s important Southern California architecture collection.

Project Blue Boy
Sep 22, 2018 – Sep 30, 2019
Huntington Art Gallery

The Blue Boy undergoes its first major technical examination and conservation treatment in public view, in a special satellite conservation studio set up in the west end of The Huntington’s grand portrait gallery.

Sustainable Luxury
Jul 14 – Nov 12, 2018
Huntington Art Gallery

This exhibition presents a selection of 18 drawings, wallpapers and textiles from The Huntington’s holdings of Morris & Co. materials.

Orbit Pavilion
Oct. 29, 2016 – Sept. 2, 2019
Celebration Lawn

The outdoor installation is the brainchild of Dan Goods and David Delgado, visual strategists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who conceived an innovative “soundscape” representing the movement of the International Space Station and 19 Earth satellites.

About The Huntington
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. More information about The Huntington can be found online at www.huntington.org

Visitor Information
The Huntington is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino, Calif., 12 miles from downtown Los Angeles. It is open to the public Wednesday through Monday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Tuesdays. Information: 626-405-2100 or www.huntington.org.

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