Data: Christine Uriu; April 22, 2010

Data: Christine Uriu; April 22, 2010

Data: Christine Uriu April 22, 2010 Source: Asia America Symphony Association Christine Uriu was born in Los Angeles, California, and graduated from UCLA with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Education and obtained her secondary teaching credential from USC. Her teaching skills were put to work at the junior high, high school, and college level. She also worked for All-Nippon Airlines as Assistant to the Manager. Her participation in community organizations include serving as a board member of the Nichi Bei Funjinkai, co-president of the Japanese American Medical Association Auxiliary, and co-president and board member of the Asia...
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Data: Los Angeles Times, 2010 April 08: Science: Japanese found to host seaweed-digesting bacteria

Japanese found to host seaweed-digesting bacteria Researchers studying enzymes that can process seaweed are astonished to find them in humans. They say the Japanese may have acquired the ability to digest nori because of their consumption of sushi. By Amina Khan April 8, 2010 Bacteria in the guts of some Japanese people may have acquired the ability to digest seaweed because of the sushi their human hosts consume, researchers have reported. The evolved trait enables their human hosts to digest carbohydrates found in edible seaweed such as nori, whose tough cell walls the human body cannot process on its...
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Japanese-Americans are learning traditional Japanese cooking

Chef Andy Matsuda Sushi Chef Institute

Cultural News, 2010 March Issue Andy Matsuda’s Sushi School / Cutting board talk By Chef Andy Matsuda Japanese foods incorporate seasonality.  Unlike the desert weather of Los Angeles, the four seasons in Japan have nurtured the distinctiveness of Japanese cuisine. When I presented a New Year program at the Japanese National Museum in Little Tokyo, Downtown Los Angeles on January 3, I explained that “mochi” (rice cake) was a typical food of the New Year celebration. I also demonstrated the cooking of Zoni soup with mochi. The Zoni soup recipes vary due to region and family traditions in Japan....
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Data 2010 Apr 03: Derek Nakamoto

Derek Nakamoto, born and raised in Honolulu, Hawai’i, has distinguished himself as a record producer, arranger-composer, as well as session keyboardist. He has produced and arranged records for artists such as The O’Jays, Teddy Pendergras, Herb Alpert, and Michael Bolton. He is best known for arranging thirteen albums for contemporary jazz keyboardist Keiko Matsui and co-wrote “Thousand Cranes” with June Kuramoto, which was recorded by Hiroshima. Derek recently produced Yoko Fujimoto’s first solo CD entitled “Morisa Komorisa” and just completed production work on international recording artist Waldermar Bastos’s upcoming CD, “Classics of My Soul”, featuring performances by The London...
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Data 2010 Apr 03: Kinnara Taiko

Kinnara Taiko is the oldest Japanese American Buddhist taiko group in North America, formed in 1969, and is named after the celestial musicians of Buddhism. As a Buddhist group, emphasis is placed on participation, self-awareness and discovering the joy in “just” playing. Kinnara is also based in the tradition of Japanese and Japanese American festival drumming, which blends traditional Japanese rhythms with American musical influences from rock to jazz to reflect the experience and lifestyles of its members. Kinnara was the first group to make their own drums from oak wine barrels, as well as their own costumes and...
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Data 2010 Apr 03: Kenny Endo

Kenny Endo is one of the leading personas in contemporary percussion and rhythm. A performer, composer, and teacher of taiko with numerous awards and accolades, Kenny Endo is a consummate artist, blending Japanese taiko with rhythms influenced from around the world into original melodies and improvisation. His thirty-five year career began as he embarked on a decade-long odyssey in his ancestral Japan, studies and performed with the masters of both traditional and ensemble drumming, and became the first non-Japanese national to receive a natori (master’s stage name) in classical drumming. Kenny is the vanguard of the taiko genre and...
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Contemporary Japanese cinema screening at USC, Feb 19-21

Contemporary Japanese cinema screening at USC, Feb 19-21

Contemporary Japanese cinema screening at USC, Feb 19-21 University of Southern California Visions and Voices program presents Contemporary Japanese Cinema: Outside, Elsewhere, In the World University Park Campus Eileen Norris Cinema Theatre Frank Sinatra Hall Admission is free. Friday, February 19 6 pm: Reception, in front of Norris Cinema Theatre 7 pm: Baton by Ryuhei Kitamura (2009, DVD, 50 min.) 8 pm: Hana and Alice by Shunji Iwai (2004, 35mm, 135 min.) 10 pm: Panel discussion featuring Shunji Iwai, Ryuhei Kitamura, Keisuke Kitano and Akira Mizuta Lippit Saturday, February 20 3 pm: Air Doll by Hirokazu Kore-eda (2009, 35mm,...
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Lecture Note: Contemporary Japanese Cinema in the world – Prof. Akira Lippit of USC, Feb 9, 2010

Lecture Note: Contemporary Japanese Cinema in the world – Prof. Akira Lippit of USC, Feb 9, 2010

Nibei Foundation Japan Study Club “Contemporary Japanese Cinema in the World” Presenter: Dr. Akira Mizuta Lippit, Professor and Chair of Critical Studies in the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California February 9, 2010 at Terasaki Laboratory Building Japan Study Club Lecture Note is complied by Cultural News Dr. Lippit has a very extensive background in cinema and gave a most interesting talk on Japanese film.  He received a B.A. in English and Film Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, 1986; M.A. in English, University of California, 1987; PhD in Humanities Center, Johns Hopkins University,...
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Nibei Foundation’s Japan Study Club:”Contemporary Japanese Cinema in the World” by Prof. Akira Mizuta Lippit of USC, Feb 9, 2010

Nibei Foundation’s Japan Study Club:”Contemporary Japanese Cinema in the World” by Prof. Akira Mizuta Lippit of USC, Feb 9, 2010

Nibei Foundation’s Japan Study Club Tuesday, Feb 9, dinner at 6:30 p.m. lecture at 7:30 p.m. $10 including dinner “Contemporary Japanese Cinema in the World” Akira Mizuta Lippit, University of Southern California This presentation looks at the revitalization and reorganization of Japanese cinema since 2000.  Beginning in the Heisei 1990s, Japanese cinema underwent a dramatic change in the ways that films were produced and consumed. No longer following the vertical models of large film studios and apprenticed directors, a new generation of younger filmmakers came to make films from other points of departure, including television, music, and straight-to-video markets,...
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You may learn sushi making skills over the Internet

Chef Andy Matsuda Sushi Chef Institute

Cultural News, 2010 February Issue Andy Matsuda’s Sushi School / Cutting board talk By Chef Andy Matsuda These days everybody goes online. So do I. After three years of planning, I am finally going to open an “Online Private Lesson” class.  Through this class, anybody can learn to make sushi anyplace in the world. This is how the class will work: The student will receive DVDs and the textbook from our school for each section. There will be three sections and each section will have DVDs and the textbook. The Part I section will introduce the tools and basic...
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Japan Behind the News >> Revising the Japan-U.S. Status of Forces Agreement

Japan Behind the News >> Revising the Japan-U.S. Status of Forces Agreement

Cultural News, February 2010 Issue By Motoaki Kamiura, Military Analyst Translated by Alan Gleason The Japan-U.S. Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA) is the treaty under which Japan provides bases on its soil for use by the U.S. military. SOFA also stipulates various forms of preferential treatment for the troops and civilian staff stationed on those bases and their families. Among these perquisites are exemption from taxation, and immunity from interrogation or arrest when crimes are committed by base personnel on duty. If, for example, an on-duty U.S. soldier is driving a car off-base and causes a fatal traffic accident...
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Lecture Note: The true story of the last samurai who were the first to colonize America – Filmmaker Brian T. Maeda – Jan 19, 2010

Lecture Note: The true story of the last samurai who were the first to colonize America – Filmmaker Brian T. Maeda – Jan 19, 2010

Nibei Foundation Japan Study Club “The true story of the last samurai who were the first to colonize America” Presenter: Mr. Brain T. Maeda, Film Director of “Samurai of Gold Hill” January 19, 2010 at Terasaki Foundation Laboratory Building Japan Study Club Lecture Note is compiled by Cultural News Mr. Maeda is a film director and producer.  Some of his projects include Pete’s Sake; Uncommon Valor; Buddhaheads; Shotokan Karate of America Dojo; and The Music Man of Manzana – a documentary. His current project is directing and producing Samurai of Gold Hill. It is with this present endeavor that...
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