2014 / Clark Center to hold opening lecture of “Kanpai” exhibition and sake tasting, Feb. 9, 2 pm

Clark Kanpai Watanabe Nangaku

Eight Drunken Sages (detail), Watanabe Nagaku (1767 – 1813), Late 18th/early 19th century, Ink and color on silk. Minneapolis Institute of Arts. The John R. Van Derlip Fund; purchase from the collection of Elizabeth and Willard Clark.

The Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture

2014 Winter Exhibition Opening Lecture

Sunday, February 9, 2:00 pm

Kanpai: The Art of Drinking in Japan

Dr. Andreas Marks, Head of the Japanese and Korean Art Department, at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Remark by Consul Hiromasa Hamasaki

Sake tasting sponsored by Asabiraki, Japan and Kuramoto US, Inc.

Reservation Required at (559) 582-4915

Tickets for non-members are $10.

The use of sake supported the rise of a diversity of different kinds of vessels for drinking and serving such as cups, flasks, and ewers.

A large section of Kanpai: The Art of Drinking in Japan showcases such objects created by living ceramic artists, representing many of the important traditional ceramic areas and styles like Shino, Oribe, and Karatsu.

The role of drink is also reflected in Japanese painting. Famous drinking parties like the gathering at the Orchid Pavilion (Chines name: Lanting) in Zhejiang Province, China, of 353, were immortalized in East Asian imagery.

Ike Taiga (1723-1776), the celebrated literati painter, painted a hanging scroll of this subject that celebrates the sophistication and gregariousness of literati culture.

Kanpai: The Art of Drinking in Japan features works from the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts as well as from Gordon Brodfuehrer, Board Member of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture. The exhibition is curated by Dr. Andreas Marks, Head of the Japanese and Korean Art Department, at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

The Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture is located at 15770 Tenth Ave, Hanford, CA 93230. www.ccjac.org

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