2015 / JACCC presents Shikishi (poem card) exhibition for celebrating the New Year, Jan 4 – Feb 15

17th Annual Shikishi Exhibition at Gorge J. Doizaki Gallery in Little Tokyo. (Cultural News Photo)

17th Annual Shikishi Exhibition at Gorge J. Doizaki Gallery in Little Tokyo. (Cultural News Photo)

17th Annual Shikishi Exhibition

The Japanese American Cultural and Community Center

244 South San Pedro Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012

Sunday, January 4, 2015 – Sunday, February 15, 2015

George J. Doizaki Gallery

Tuesday – Friday, noon – 5 p.m., Saturday & Sunday, 11 a.m.- 4 p.m.

Admission Free

Every January Little Tokyo becomes the center for celebrating the Japanese New Year in Southern Califronia, with the JACCC heading up the festivities with programs that invigorate the spirit and imagination.

In celebration of the New Year, the JACCC distributes shikishi to members of the community to participate in a very unique exhibition, expressing hope for the New Year or a variation on the theme of Hatsu-Yuki (First Snow).

Shikishi paperboards have been used in Japan since the 12th Century for painting and writing poetry. Today inscribed shikishi are given as a gift to mark a memorable occasion.

Curatorial Message by Hirokazu Kosaka

Shikishi exhibition curator Hirokazu Kosaka and his shikishi. (Cultural News Photo)

Shikishi exhibition curator Hirokazu Kosaka and his shikishi. (Cultural News Photo)

The Shikshi is an ancient Japanese format used for painting and writing poetry. Sometimes referred to as a “poem card,” they have been in use since at least the eighth century. Today, inscribed shikishi are given as gift to mark a memorable occasion, and receiving one is always considered an honor.

The delightfully eclectic shikishi here on display are the creative work of over 100 individuals. Evidenced by the artistic variety on display, the works were created by people of every age and from all walks of life, from here in Los Angeles and as far away as India. The annual exhibition is open to anyone with creative spark to express his or her hopes for the New Year. Reference to this year’s exhibition theme, Hatsu Yuki (First Snow), are peppered throughout the gallery.

Hatsu, the word for “first,” becomes attached to nearly all activities. Hatsu-hinode, first sunrise; Hatsu-game, first tea ceremony; Hatsu-yume, first dream; Hatsu-ryo, first catch. One best effort is required on any “first”  occasion to ensure success in the coming year.

The Japanese American Cultural and Community Center is 100 times honored by the wonderful diverse shikishi submission and the enthusiastic community support we have received. We hope the Year of the Sheep brings great health, happiness, and creativity and that you enjoy the JACCC’s 2015 “Hatsu-exhibition.”